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Neu hier? Immer einlesen auf Fitness Experts.de & Fitladies.de



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    • Setting Up Westside for the Raw Lifter (Anmerkung: Hier ist mir offensichtlich die Quelle verloren gegangen... wenn ich recht erinnere könnte es von Jordan Syatt gewesen sein.)   The Westside Method is widely accepted as the "go-to" system for developing absolute strength. The system utilizes the max effort method, dynamic effort method, and the repetition effort method. How you choose to use these principles will determine your success. This is exactly what I will be discussing in this article.   Louie has spent a long time perfecting the Westside Method for geared lifters. However, if you’re a raw lifter, then you may need to tweak some things to suit your individual needs. Westside is a system, not a program. If something isn’t working, ditch it. Max Effort Method   The max effort method is your meat and potatoes. It involves rotating the main lift every one to three weeks. This allows you to handle maximum weight 90-100% every week.   When selecting the exercises in you rotation, pick exercises that actually target your sticking point. If you’re weak off the chest, would you choose the incline press or a close-grip 4-board? Exactly. I have had good results by training my weakness for two max effort workouts and then my strong point for the next session, repeated in that fashion.   If I feel like crap one day, then I’ll do a triple or a max set of five instead. Don’t be afraid to do this. It’s not going to make you weaker - not every day can be the day. Dynamic Effort Method   You gotta be fast to be strong! If I neglect speed work, my lifts start to move slowly, my deadlifts won’t budge, and I can’t hit PRs. Not good. Like it or not, the dynamic effort method will develop explosiveness that will compliment your maximum strength. Also, speed work is often done for 6-12 sets for 1-3 reps, making it a great opportunity to practice your setup and technique.   Now, before I get into percentages, think about this: Some people are faster than they are strong, and vice versa. Not everyone can lift 60% at 0.9- 1.2m/s. If you’re having a bad day, that 60% can be more like 70%. The correct percentage for you will have to be determined by your bar speed on the day. So, if you’re a "grinder" and you need to use 35% to be fast, then stay with it. Just remember what speed work is about and why you’re doing it.   Repetition Effort Method   Train like a bodybuilder...but before you go reaching for you iPhone to post shirtless selfies of yourself on your Instagram account, remember that this is Powerlifting. This is the method used to build muscle where it’s needed in order to bring up our competition lifts.     The supplemental lift will come after the main movement and should specifically target your weak point. The accessory lift comes next. This exercise should help build the supplemental. Again, choosing the appropriate supplemental and accessory exercises can be a daunting and frustrating task and may take some trial and error. The exercises you choose will be based on your individual weaknesses and how you’re built. Since we’re building muscle here, I recommend using full ROM exercises over partials for the added time under tension.   Take the bench press for example:   Weak off the chest: Incline DB presses Weak midpoint: Incline barbell press Weak lockout: Close-grip incline press   Bands and chains can be added, but don’t go crazy with them. Keep in mind that the supplemental lifts are used to build muscle. Also remember that accommodating resistance is harder on the CNS than straight weight, and bands more so than chains. Two Common Misconceptions   Below are two training tools associated with Westside that are quite popular to bash, perhaps due to the raw vs. geared debate or those who believe Westside is for geared lifters only. Either way, it’s a load of crap. Box Squats   These have been getting a bad rap by a lot of people. Box squats will develop the posterior chain like nothing else. They can be used for max effort, dynamic effort, or even as a supplemental lift. They teach you to stay tight and how to be explosive, and they’re also easier to recover from than regular squats. What more do you want?!   The biggest problem I see with box squats is when they are performed incorrectly. If you don’t sit back far enough, if you lose tightness, or if you end up rocking off the box, then don’t be surprised if they don’t yield any results. Ease into these until you nail the form. Remember, as with all lifts, you’re only as strong as your technique.   Bands and Chains   Bands and chains are a great tool to use in your training. They make you faster and stronger, and they teach you to get tight. It's too bad that most people don’t know how to use them.   Louie recommends setting up the accommodating resistance to give 25% at the top of the lift. For some reason everyone seems to think that this is set in stone! If your raw deadlift was weak off the floor, then do you really need any accommodating resistance? Probably not.   Here is an example of the kind of accommodating resistance percentages you might be better off using based on the sticking point. I’ll use the bench press again:   Weak off the chest: No accommodating resistance Weak midpoint: 10-15% accommodating resistance Weak lockout: 20-25% accommodating resistance   Bringing up a Weak Point   A weak point can be caused by technical, mental or physical influences. I’m not going to touch on the technical or mental aspects as there are plenty of articles and instructional videos out there already. However, a physical weak point can be caused by a lack of:   Strength Speed Hypertrophy   Don’t fall victim to the belief that you can simultaneously increase these three attributes effectively. If you’re strong but need to be more explosive, then lower the max work so that you can focus on speed. For best results, pick one attribute for the squat/deadlift and the bench press, and train the others enough to maintain them.   It is no coincidence that I started smashing my old squat PRs when I wasn’t able to bench press or deadlift for three months after my wrist surgery. I’m sure you’ve probably heard about other lifters in similar situations; some guy can't squat or deadlift due to a lower back issue. However, six months later, his bench is up 20 pounds! Maybe that’s why it’s not uncommon for bench-only guys to have a double bodyweight bench? Something to think about...   "Do less for strong body parts and more for weak ones. Don't just add volume on top of volume for someone who is already training hard." – John Meadows.   Here are some questions, which I stole from Jim Wendler, to help you assess your weakness:   Strength: Can you grind out a max effort lift for three to five seconds, or do you just fade out? Speed: Do sets with 60% of your max move explosively? Hypertrophy: Do you have enough muscle mass to compete in your weight class?   Once you find the area that needs improvement, as well as those areas that you need to maintain, you can use the below as a rough guide of how to program your training:     Maintain Regular Push Max Effort 3-5 lifts @ 80-100% 3 lifts @ 90-100% 4-5 @ 90-100% Dynamic Effort 18 lifts 24 lifts 30 lifts Repetition Method* 3x5 5x5 4x10 Score** 1 2 3 * Supplemental on ME and DE Days; ** Ability to recover – from easy to hard   Whatever combination you choose, your score should be no more than six for the bench press and the squat/deadlift.   Progression   Don’t jump straight into high amounts of work. Instead, allow your body to adjust. Drop the other things back before you gradually increase the work needed to bring up your weakness.   Dave Tate, in the elitefts™ bench manual, talks about Bridging — the term he uses to explain a smart progressive way to add volume to a weak point from one workout to the next in order to avoid injury. This is accomplished by changing exercises and using a heavier one each workout. Take the triceps for example: pushdowns, dumbbell extensions, barbell extensions, JM press, and high board presses.   In regards to the recommendations for the repetition effort method in this guide, that’s based solely on my training. You be the judge of what high/low volume is for you. Final Thoughts   It’s also worth mentioning that, when choosing exercises, you need to be realistic in terms of what you can recover from. Not everyone can deadlift every week and get stronger. Louie once said, "Why do an exercise that takes more than it gives back?" He advocates using speed pulls, various types of box squats, and good mornings to build the deadlift. A front squat done without a belt is going to be easier to recover from than a reverse band deadlift. You still max out but less weight is needed to do so, meaning you can recover faster.
    • How I would westside, by Chad Smith   The methods used by a certain powerlifting gym in Columbus, Ohio are undoubtedly among the most popular in powerlifting and strength & conditioning today. This gym has produced some of the strongest geared powerlifters in history through the use of heavy good mornings, box squatting, training with bands and chains and partial range bench press movements, not to mention excellent coaching and atmosphere. The gym’s owner has also greatly contributed to the strength community by publishing in depth articles on his club’s training through their website and various publications like Powerlifting USA. As great as this gym’s methods are for producing great strength in multiply powerlifting, I feel they are often misused when trying to develop strength in the raw lifter. It is undeniable that raw and geared lifting are different animals, the strength curves are different and the means which are used to develop them must be different. Differences between raw and geared training…   1-Full Range Movements: The raw lifter must place greater attention to developing strength through the full range of motion of a lift. Multiply bench shirts and squat suits aid the lifter greatly during the bottom portion of each lift, placing much greater emphasis on the lifter’s top end strength. Rarely do you see raw lifters miss benches at lockout or squats in the top half, so they must devote more energy to training full ROM (or even beyond full ROM) lifts than the geared lifter.   The geared and raw squat utilize much different techniques and thus must be trained differently.   2-Practice of the Competition Lifts: There are many more movements that have correspondence to the geared lifter than there is for their raw counterparts, because of this the raw lifter must use a smaller pool of max effort exercises and must perform the competition lifts (squat, bench, deadlift) more frequently. One of the main criticisms I have of this style of Conjugate Periodization for raw lifters, is that too many people will tend to use a wide variety of max effort lifts and in doing so are never really able to build enough skill in the lift to progress and can’t measure their progress.   3-The Deadlift: In 2012, big geared totals are built with massive squats and benches, big raw totals are built on massive squats and deads. It is often joked about in powerlifting circles that this Columbus based gym places no attention on the deads (that isn’t to say that they haven’t had some great pullers). The typical Conjugate template is full of box squats and good mornings, but deadlifts aren’t often a staple. If you wanna be a great puller, you’ve got to pull. Deadlifts need to be part of your max effort rotation and they need to be addressed with supplementary work and on dynamic effort days.     4-Volume: The raw lifter can’t handle the same poundages that the geared lifter can and because of this they can and need to handle more volume. The raw lifter needs to build volume, particularly early in a training cycle, through back down sets of their main movement and variations of the competition movement.   It isn’t uncommon to see great raw lifters perform great feats of rep effort strength. ... Increase the volume of your training and watch your raw lifts skyrocket!!     Chad’s Conjugate Periodization Template   Day 1-Max Effort Upper Body   Plyometric Pushup Variation-These are the best way to build explosive upper body strength and will have great carryover to your bar speed. Max Effort Upper Body Movement-A rotation of 3 exercises will be utilized here. DB Press Variation-The DB Press variation picked each week will be used to compliment your max effort movement by training a different ROM. Horizontal Row Variation-Training the back hard is critical to building a massive bench. Horizontal rows are great because they allow you to directly train the antagonists to your pressing muscles. Shoulders/Biceps/Triceps-This training will utilize the Repetition Effort Method and will aim to build size in these muscle groups.   Day 2-Max Effort Lower Body   Box Jump Variation-Jumping exercises will build great explosiveness and the best way to get through a sticking point is to blast through them with speed. Doing these before heavy squats or deads will prime your CNS through a post-potentiation effect and better prepare you to handle heavy weights. Max Effort Lower Body Movement-A rotation of 3 exercises will be utilized here. Supplementary Lower Body Movement-This movement will compliment the max effort movement. When using a squat variation as your main movement, we will use a deadlift variation for supplementary work and vice versa. This will allow you to strengthen weakpoints, add volume and improve technique through repeption. Posterior Chain Work-Big squats and pulls require big hamstring, glutes and erectors, train them hard. Abdominal Training-A strong midsection is critical to supporting big weights on your back or in your hands, don’t neglect training your abs and training them heavy.   Brandon Lilly has a pro total in gear after training at Westside Barbell and Lexen Extreme with the legendary squatter, Chuck Vogelpohl.       I recently sat down with former Westside Barbell and Lexen Extreme lifter, Brandon Lilly, to talk about how he would tweak Conjugate Periodization for a raw lifter. Here are some of his thoughts…   -Lower Your Percentages from what is outlined in articles or you will break down your body   -Use gear (briefs, loose suit) to protect your body and allow you to overload the movement and train your CNS   -Do bodybuilding work to develop the individual muscle groups   -Use the box squat to develop your hips and glutes but at some point you must remove the box to accommodate what you will do in the meet. For my full interview with Brandon click here   Day 3-Dynamic Effort Upper Body   Speed Bench Press-Speed in the bench is critical just as it is in the squat. Train your speed bench from a variety of grips to improve your pressing power. Overhead Pressing Variation-The overhead press is great for building a huge raw bench, include them in your training and watch your numbers skyrocket. Vertical Rowing Variation-Hit the back from all angles to help it grow and maintain healthy shoulders. Tricep Work-Big, strong triceps are key to a massive bench in gear or raw, train the horseshoes hard. Direct Chest Work-Direct chest training won’t just build size and strength in the pecs, it will also help keep you healthy. Rear Delts/Biceps/Upper Back Superset-Rear delt and upper back strength and size is critical to a big press and healthy shoulders. Bicep work is often overlooked by today’s lifters, but all-time greats like Bill Kazmaier and Doug Young definitely weren’t shy about training their guns.   Day 4-Dynamic Effort Lower Body   Dynamic Effort Deadlift Variation-Dynamic effort deads are a great way to work on your deadlift technique without overtraining Dynamic Effort Squat Variation-Great bar speed is key to a great squat. The dynamic effort work for the raw squatter though should be done without a box. Unilateral Leg Training-Quad dominant, unilateral leg work will help you build big, strong quads (key to a big raw squat) and stability. Posterior Chain Work Abdominal Training     Full 12 Week Training Cycle   Ideally this training would be done on Monday, Wednesday, Friday and Saturday or a similar split of the days.   Now that you know how I would set the training up, let’s take a look at a full meet (12 week) training cycle designed for the raw lifter.     Weeks 1-4 (Anmerkung: Formatierung ist verloren gegangen.) Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 (Deload) Day 1 Day 1 Day 1 Day 1 1-Explosive Pushup onto Box-4×2 1-Explosive Pushup onto Box-5×2 1-Explosive Pushup onto Box-6×2 1-Explosive Pushup onto Box-3×2 2-2 Board Press-Up to 3rm, Backdown-75% of day’s best 3×5-8 2-Floor Press-Up to 3rm, Backdown-75% of day’s best 3×5-8 2-Bench Press-Up to 3rm, Backdown-75% of day’s best 3×5-8 2-Reverse Band Press-75% of Week 3’s bench for 3×5 3-DB Incline Bench-2×12 3-DB Flat Bench-2×12 3-DB Floor Press-2×12 3-Chest Supported Rows-3×10 4a-Chest Supported Rows-5×15 4a-Chest Supported Rows-5×12 4b-Chest Supported Rows-5×10 4-Arms and Shoulders-2×15-20 of whatever you want 4b-Band Pullaparts-5×20 4b-Band Pullaparts-5×20 4b-Band Pullaparts-5×20 5a-DB Front Raises-3×20 5a-DB Front Raises-3×15 5a-DB Front Raises-3×12 5b-DB Hammer Curls-3×20 5b-DB Hammer Curls-3×15 5b-DB Hammer Curls-3×12 5c-Rope Pushdowns-3×20 5c-Rope Pushdowns-3×15 5c-Rope Pushdowns-3×12 Day 2 Day 2 Day 2 Day 2 1-Seated Box Jump wearing 25-50# weight vest-6×3 to 75% of max height 1- Seated Box Jump wearing 25-50# vest-5×2 to 85% of max height 1- Seated Box Jump wearing 25-50# vest-4×1 up to a max height 1-Seated Box Jump-3×3 to 75% of max height 2-Safety Squat Bar Squats-Up to 3rm 2-Deadlift-Up to 3rm 2-Back Squat-Up to 3rm 2-Reverse Band Squat-75% of Week 3 Squat 3×5 3-Rack Pulls-3×5 at 55-75% 3-Dead Squats-10×1 at 60% w/ 1 min rests 3-Defecit Pulls-3×5 at 55-75% 3-GHRs-3×10 4-GHRs-5×15 4-GHRs-5×12 4-GHRs-5×10 4-Ab Wheel-2×10 5a-Ab Wheel-3×15 5a-Ab Wheel-3×12 5a-Ab Wheel-3×10 5b-BB Twists-3×15/15 5b-BB Twists-3×12/12 5b-BB Twists-3×12/12 Day 3 Day 3 Day 3 Day 3 1-Speed Bench Press w/ Chains-6×3 at 60% 1-Speed Bench Press w/ Chains-6×3 at 65% 1-Speed Bench Press w/ Chains-6×3 at 70% 1-Speed Bench Press-6×3 at 50% 2-Seated Military Press to Top of Head-2×12 2-Seated Military Press to Top of Head-2×10 2-Seated Military Press to Top of Head-2×8 2-Seated Military Press to Top of Head-2×5 (Light) 3-Chinups-5×5 with weight, 1xAMAP with bodyweight 3-Chinups-5×5 with weight, 1xAMAP with bodyweight 3-Chinups-5×5 with weight, 1xAMAP with bodyweight 3-Chinups-3×5 with bodyweight 4-Dips-3×8 with weight 4-Dips-3×8 with weight 4-Dips-3×8 with weight 4-Dips-2×5 with bodyweight 5-DB Incline Flies-2×12 5-DB Incline Flies-2×12 6-DB Incline Flies-2×12 6a-DB 90/90 Swings-2×20 6a-DB 90/90 Swings-2×15 6a-DB 90/90 Swings-2×12 6b-BB Curls-2×20 6b-BB Curls-2×15 6b-BB Curls-2×12 6c-DB Shrugs-2×20 6c-DB Shrugs-2×15 6c-DB Shrugs-2×12 Day 4 Day 4 Day 4 Day 4 1-Speed Deadlift w/ Chains-6×1 at 50% 1-Speed Deadlift w/ Chains-6×1 at 55% 1-Speed Deadlift w/ Chains-6×1 at 60% 1-Speed Deads-3×3 at 50% 2-Speed Squats w/ Chains-6×2 at 50% 2-Speed Squats w/ Chains-6×2 at 55% 2-Speed Squats w/ Chains-6×2 at 60% 2-Speed Squats-3×3 at 50% 3-Single Leg Squats-2×8 each leg 3-Single Leg Squats-2×7 each leg 3-Single Leg Squats-2×6 each leg 3-Reverse Hypers-2×10 4-Reverse Hypers-3×15 4-Reverse Hypers-3×12 4-Reverse Hypers-3×12 5a-Wide Leg Situps-3×15 5a-Wide Leg Situps-3×12 5a-Wide Leg Situps-3×12 5b-DB Side Bends-3×15/15 5b-DB Side Bends-3×12/12 5b-DB Side Bends-3×12/12     Utilizing backdown sets, like the 75%x3x5-8 after the ME Bench work on Day 1, is a great way to build size and practice technique.   Elite raw powerlifter, Yessica Martinez of Miami, FL, uses Westside methods for her training…I’m sold Click here to listen to my interview with Yessica Week 5-8 Week 5 Week 6 Week 7 Week 8 (Deload) Day 1 Day 1 Day 1 Day 1 1-Drop Pushups-4×2 1-Drop Pushup-5×2 1-Drop Pushup-6×2 1-Drop Pushup-3×2 2-2 Board Press-Up to 2rm, Backdown-80% of day’s best 2×3-5 2-Floor Press-Up to 2rm, Backdown-80% of day’s best 2×3-5 2-Bench Press-Up to 2rm, Backdown-80% of day’s best 2×3-5 2-Reverse Band Press-80% of Week 3’s bench for 3×3 3-DB Incline Bench-2×10 3-DB Flat Bench-2×10 3-DB Floor Press-2×10 3-Chest Supported Rows-3×10 4a-DB Rows-5×15 4a-DB Rows-5×12 4b-Chest Supported Rows-5×10 4-Arms and Shoulders-2×15-20 of whatever you want 4b-Band Pullaparts-5×20 4b-Band Pullaparts-5×20 4b-Band Pullaparts-5×20 5a-DB Front Raises-3×20 5a-DB Front Raises-3×15 5a-DB Front Raises-3×12 5b-DB Hammer Curls-3×20 5b-DB Hammer Curls-3×15 5b-DB Hammer Curls-3×12 5c-Rope Pushdowns-3×20 5c-Rope Pushdowns-3×15 5c-Rope Pushdowns-3×12 Day 2 Day 2 Day 2 Day 2 1-Seated Box Jump-6×3 to 80% of max height 1- Seated Box Jump-5×2 to 90% of max height 1- Seated Box Jump-4×1 up to a max height 1-Seated Box Jump-3×3 to 75% of max height 2-Safety Squat Bar Squats-Up to 2rm 2-Deadlift-Up to 2rm 2-Back Squat-Up to 2rm 2-Reverse Band Squat-80% of Week 3 Squat 3×3 3-Rack Pulls-3×3 at 60-80% 3-Dead Squats-6×1 at 70%-90 sec rest 3-Defecit Pulls-3×3 at 60-80% 3-GHRs-3×10 4-GHRs-4×12 4-GHRs-4×10 4-GHRs-4×8 4-Ab Wheel-2×10 5a-Ab Wheel-3×12 5a-Ab Wheel-3×10 5a-Ab Wheel-3×8 5b-BB Twists-3×12/12 5b-BB Twists-3×10/10 5b-BB Twists-3×8/8 Day 3 Day 3 Day 3 Day 3 1-Speed Bench Press w/ Bands-6×3 at 60% 1-Speed Bench Press w/ Bands-6×3 at 65% 1-Speed Bench Press w/ Bands-6×3 at 70% 1-Speed Bench Press-6×3 at 50% 2-Seated Military Press to Top of Head-2×8 2-Seated Military Press to Top of Head-2×7 2-Seated Military Press to Top of Head-2×6 2-Seated Military Press to Top of Head-2×5 (Light) 3-Chinups-5×5 with weight, 1xAMAP with bodyweight 3-Chinups-4×5 with weight, 1xAMAP with bodyweight 3-Chinups-3×5 with weight, 1xAMAP with bodyweight 3-Chinups-3×5 with bodyweight 4-Dips-3×6 with weight 4-Dips-3×6 with weight 4-Dips-3×6 with weight 4-Dips-2×5 with bodyweight 5-DB Incline Flies-2×12 5-DB Incline Flies-2×12 6-DB Incline Flies-2×12 6a-DB 90/90 Swings-2×20 6a-DB 90/90 Swings-2×15 6a-DB 90/90 Swings-2×12 6b-BB Curls-2×20 6b-BB Curls-2×15 6b-BB Curls-2×12 6c-DB Shrugs-2×20 6c-DB Shrugs-2×15 6c-DB Shrugs-2×12 Day 4 Day 4 Day 4 Day 4 1-Speed Deadlift w/ Bands-5×1 at 50% 1-Speed Deadlift w/ Bands-5×1 at 55% 1-Speed Deadlift w/ Bands-5×1 at 60% 1-Speed Deads-3×3 at 50% 2-Speed Squats w/ Bands-5×2 at 50% 2-Speed Squats w/ Bands-5×2 at 55% 2-Speed Squats w/ Bands-5×2 at 60% 2-Speed Squats-3×3 at 50% 3-BB Lunges-2×8 each leg 3-BB Lunges-2×7 each leg 3-BB Lunges-2×6 each leg 3-Reverse Hypers-2×10 4-Reverse Hypers-3×15 4-Reverse Hypers-3×12 4-Reverse Hypers-3×12 5a-Wide Leg Situps-3×12 5a-Wide Leg Situps-3×10 5a-Wide Leg Situps-3×10 5b-DB Side Bends-3×12/12 5b-DB Side Bends-3×10/10 5b-DB Side Bends-3×10/10     For exercises that don’t outline percentages or guide you towards a rep max, you want to use a weight that is challenging but still submaximal, don’t miss reps ever on supplementary or accessory work. Week 9-12 Week 9 Week 10 Week 11 Week 12 (Deload) Day 1 Day 1 Day 1 Day 1 1-Rebound Pushups-4×2 1-Rebound Pushup-5×2 1-Rebound Pushup-6×2 1-Rebound Pushup-3×2 2-2 Board Press-Up to 1rm, Backdown-85% of day’s best 1×2-3 2-Floor Press-Up to 1rm, Backdown-85% of day’s best 1×2-3 2-Bench Press-Up to 1rm, Backdown-85% of day’s best 1×2-3 2-Reverse Band Press-85% of Week 3’s bench for 3×1 3-DB Incline Bench-2×8 3-DB Flat Bench-2×8 3-DB Floor Press-2×8 3-Chest Supported Rows-3×10 4a-Reverse Band Rows-5×15 4a-Reverse Band Rows-5×12 4b-Reverse Band Rows-5×10 4-Arms and Shoulders-2×15-20 of whatever you want 4b-Band Pullaparts-5×20 4b-Band Pullaparts-5×20 4b-Band Pullaparts-5×20 5a-DB Front Raises-3×20 5a-DB Front Raises-3×15 5a-DB Front Raises-3×12 5b-DB Hammer Curls-3×20 5b-DB Hammer Curls-3×15 5b-DB Hammer Curls-3×12 5c-Rope Pushdowns-3×20 5c-Rope Pushdowns-3×15 5c-Rope Pushdowns-3×12 Day 2 Day 2 Day 2 Day 2 1-Depth Jumps from 18”-3×5 1- Depth Jumps from 21”-3×4 1- Depth Jumps from 24”-3×3 1-Seated Box Jump-3×3 to 75% of max height 2-Safety Squat Bar Squats-Up to 1rm 2-Deadlift-Up to 1rm 2-Back Squat-Up to 1rm 2-Reverse Band Squat-80% of Week 3 Squat 3×3 3-Rack Pulls-5, 3, 1 at 65-85% 3-Dead Squats-3×1 at 70-80%-120 sec rest 3-Defecit Pulls-5, 3, 1 at 65-85% 3-GHRs-3×10 4-GHRs-3×10 4-GHRs-3×8 4-GHRs-3×6 4-Ab Wheel-2×10 5a-Ab Wheel-3×10 5a-Ab Wheel-3×8 5a-Ab Wheel-3×6 5b-BB Twists-3×10/10 5b-BB Twists-3×8/8 5b-BB Twists-3×6/6 Day 3 Day 3 Day 3 Day 3 1-Speed Bench Press-6×3 at 60% 1-Speed Bench Press-6×3 at 65% 1-Speed Bench Press-6×3 at 70% 1-Speed Bench Press-6×3 at 50% 2-Seated Military Press to Top of Head-2×5 2-Seated Military Press to Top of Head-2×4 2-Seated Military Press to Top of Head-2×3 2-Seated Military Press to Top of Head-2×5 (Light) 3-Chinups-3×5 with weight, 1xAMAP with bodyweight 3-Chinups-3×4 with weight, 1xAMAP with bodyweight 3-Chinups-3×3 with weight, 1xAMAP with bodyweight 3-Chinups-3×5 with bodyweight 4-Dips-3×5 with weight 4-Dips-3×5 with weight 4-Dips-3×5 with weight 4-Dips-2×5 with bodyweight 5-DB Incline Flies-2×12 5-DB Incline Flies-2×12 6-DB Incline Flies-2×12 6a-DB 90/90 Swings-2×20 6a-DB 90/90 Swings-2×15 6a-DB 90/90 Swings-2×12 6b-BB Curls-2×20 6b-BB Curls-2×15 6b-BB Curls-2×12 6c-DB Shrugs-2×20 6c-DB Shrugs-2×15 6c-DB Shrugs-2×12 Day 4 Day 4 Day 4 Day 4 1-Speed Deadlift-4×1 at 50% 1-Speed Deadlift-4×1 at 55% 1-Speed Deadlift-4×1 at 60% 1-Speed Deads-3×3 at 50% 2-Speed Squats-4×2 at 50% 2-Speed Squats-4×2 at 55% 2-Speed Squats-4×2 at 60% 2-Speed Squats-3×3 at 50% 3-BB Step Ups-2×8 each leg 3-BB Step Ups-2×7 each leg 3-BB Step Ups-2×6 each leg 3-Reverse Hypers-2×10 4-Reverse Hypers-3×15 4-Reverse Hypers-3×12 4-Reverse Hypers-3×12 5a-Wide Leg Situps-3×10 5a-Wide Leg Situps-3×8 5a-Wide Leg Situps-3×6 5b-DB Side Bends-3×10/10 5b-DB Side Bends-3×8/8 5b-DB Side Bends-3×6/6   Final Considerations   There isn’t anything too fancy or clever about this program. Three weeks of 3 rep maxes, 3 weeks of 2 rep maxes, 3 weeks of 1 rep maxes; decreasing volume of supplementary work and basic assistance work to promote growth and stay healthy. Use this simple equation to compare your 3, 2 and 1rm and set goals for yourself each week…   .033(Weight Used x Reps)+Weight=Projected Max   For example if you bench press 315×3 in week 3, a projected max of 346; during week 6 you should aim to do at least 330×2, a projected max of 351. Go into each session with a goal number in mind and stick to that plan. Another important thing to keep in mind when doing Max Effort work is to NEVER MISS REPS!! Missing reps doesn’t make you stronger, making them does, plus missing reps is a bad habit to get into and will wreak havoc on your confidence. If the plan for the day calls for a 3rm, you are much better off doing something slightly lighter for 3 and walk away telling yourself you had it for 4+ reps, than getting 2 reps and missing a 3rd. Success breeds confidence.   Conjugate Periodization is a proven system to get people brutally strong, make sure that you are choosing your ME exercises wisely, using a small enough exercise pool that you can really track your progress and getting in ample volume to improve your motor learning. Do all of these things and Conjugate Periodization can produce huge numbers for a raw lifter as well.  
    • Westside (Forenbeitrag v. Kenny Croxdale):   Westside does focus on the geared lifter.   A lot of auxiliary work involves partial movement to finish the top part of the lift.   That because the squat suits and bench shirt increase the load you can drive out of the hole in a squat and off the chest in the bench press.   However, it can and should be utilized by Raw Lifters, as well.   Raw Lifter:   The hardest part for raw lifter is in the first third of the movement in coming out of the hole in the squat and off the chest in the deadlift.   Thus, strength need to be developed at the bottom of the squat and bench press.   Pause Reps:   Performing Paused Squats and Pausing the Bar on the chest in the Bench Press with reps with heavy load is one of the keys.   The pause need to be 4 second or longer. This kills the stretch reflex and means strength is required to drive the weight up.   Plyometric Squat and Bench Training:   However, performing squats and the bench press with a recoil develop the stretch reflex.   The stretch reflex is like loading a spring by pushing down on it. Once the spring is released, it recoils up with more force.   The same applies with the squat and bench press. That why you squat more with a slight bounce out of the hole in a squat and bench more with a touch and go.   Competition Powerlifting Bench Press:   In the competition bench press, the bar must be paused on the chest.   Research shows that the stretch reflex is retained for up to approximately 4 seconds.   However, it dissipates quickly. Fifty percent of the stretch reflex dissolves in one second.   Thus, the longer it sit (on your chest), the heavier it gets.   With that said, the press signal is less than 4 seconds. So, raw lifter need to train the stretch reflex to maximize their bench.   Classic Powerlifting Routine:   The classic powerlifting routines is not the optimal method.   The focus is on performing repetition with the squat, bench press and deadlift.   The problem with that method is that once fatigue set in, technique deteriorates.   You end up "hard wiring" bad technique into your "mother board".   Pole Vaulting For Reps:   The majority of sports use resistance training as a means of increasing strength for their sport.   For some odd reason, powerlifter use the specific sports movement to develop strength in the squat, bench press and deadlift.   It the only sport that does that.   Taking A Page From Other Sports:   Research show that skill development is best accomplished in lifting by performing the movement with load of near max, 85% plus for single repetitions.   In performing heavy singles for technique development, once your form begins to falter, STOP! Continuing with bad form develops bad form.   Strength development for the squat, bench press and deadlift are best accomplished by employing movement that are similar in nature to the competition lifts.   Squat Example   1) Zercher Squats   2) High Bar Squats   3) Safety Bar Squats   4) Front Squats   5) Etc.   Maxing Out:   To maximize strength, these type of auxiliary exercise need to be pushed to failure at some point (not during every workout).   That means on the final rep, it doesn't matter how ugly the lift is...Push/Pull it up or die trying!   Recycling:   Once you have pushed a movement to that limit, drop it from your program for a few months and use another auxiliary exercise that is similar.   Poster Children:   The poster children for this type of training are Olympic Lifters.   The foundation on Westside methods are build on the methods of Olympic Lifters.   Summary:   1) Raw Lifter need to focus on building strength first.   2) Raw Lifter also need to include power movements.   3) Build strength with auxiliary movement.   4) Develop technique with heavy singles. 85% plus X 1 Repetition.   5) Once technique falter with heavy singles, STOP!!! This insure you do NOT develop bad technique.   Kenny Croxdale
    • Krafttraining ist für (viele) Sportler nur sog. "General Physical Preparedness" (GPP). (frei nach Zitat von Jim Wendler)   Was bedeutet das eigentlich?   Zunächst einmal bedeutet es, dass Krafttraining nicht die allererste Priorität ist und insgesamt mit dem Training in der Sportart konkurriert, was Energie und Ressourcen angeht (hier schreibe ich jetzt nicht von Kraftdreikampf o. ä., sondern eher von Sportarten wie Volleyball u. a.*). Dies hat zwangsläufig Auswirkungen auf das Krafttraining, was ich in ein paar Punkten skizzieren werde.   Wer, um beim Beispiel Volleyball zu bleiben, bisher in der Freizeit oder in den unteren Ligen Volleyball spielt und noch kein Krafttraining gemacht hat, der wird sehr sicher vom Krafttraining in Hinblick auf Sprungkraft und Athletik profitieren. Aspekte wie Prehab gehören auch zu den positiven Effekten, die man durch gezieltes Krafttraining abdecken kann. Allerdings muss man ein paar Dinge dabei beachten...   Ein offensichtlicher Punkt ist natürlich die Belastungssteuerung und noch grundsätzlicher die Frage, ob und wieviel "Extratraining" man individuell überhaupt noch unterbringen und verkraften kann, wenn man bereits 2-3x die Woche in seiner Sportart trainiert (Ausdauertraining ist ja auch ein Thema in den meisten Sportarten). Zwangsläufig sollte man sich daher auf das Nötigste beschränken und das heißt i. d. R. wenige Einheiten (2-3) Ganzkörpertraining mit den wichtigsten Mehrgelenkübungen ("Grundübungen": Kniebeuge, Kreuzheben, Bankdrücken, Überkopfdrücken (evtl. mit Vorbehalt), Rudern, Klimmzüge; evtl. "eingedampft" auf "a Squat, a Push and a Pull", also 3 Übungen, bspw. Kniebeuge, Schrägbankdrücken und Rudern). Ggf. muss man anhand der Jahrestrainingsplanung (innerhalb und außerhalb der Saison) gewisse Schwerpunkte setzen. Anhand der bisher genannten Programmbeispiele ist man also mit einfachen Anfängerprogrammen wie WKM, Starting Strength oder StrongLifts 5x5 für den Anfang gut bedient. Später würde ich, aus verschiedenen Gründen, 5/3/1 oder WS4SB empfehlen, aber sicher gibt es auch andere Möglichkeiten. Im Verlauf des Trainings wird man in Hinblick auf die Belastungssteuerung aber darauf achten müssen, wann die Lineare Progression ausgeschöpft ist und sollte zeitig darauf reagieren, gerade wenn man voll in der Saison sein sollte.   Ein weiterer Punkt, der zu beachten ist, ist die Frage der Trainingsspezifität und der oben genannte Hinweis, dass Krafttraining als GPP nur der Unterstützung der eigentlichen Sportart dient. Als praktisches Beispiel sei wieder der Volleyballer (in den unteren Ligen) genannt. Wer nun in so einer Situation mit Krafttraining beginnt, der wird in Hinblick auf seine Sprungkraft sicherlich davon profitieren, wenn er seine Maximalkraft bei den Kniebeugen verbessert. Allerdings gilt dies nur bis zu einem gewissen Punkt, da es bei steigenden Gewichten (Last) immer länger dauert, seine Maximalkraft zu entfalten... länger, als man beim Volleyball für seine Sprünge Zeit hat. Wenn man diesen Punkt erreicht, bringt eine weitere Erhöhung der Maximalkraft so direkt nichts mehr und es muss der sog. "Kraftanstieg" trainiert werden. Über den dicken Daumen kann man wohl sagen, dass Kniebeugen mit dem eigenen Körpergewicht, hin zum 1,5-fachen und vielleicht auch noch bis zum 2-fachen Körpergewicht positiv sind, aber darüberhinaus für den Volleyballer (der unteren Ligen) mehr Aufwand, als Ertrag bringen.   Apropos "Aufwand und Ertrag"... In der Regel wird das normale Training in der Sportart dafür sorgen, dass die im Krafttraining erworbenen körperlichen Fähigkeiten positiv umgesetzt werden. Dazu ist am Anfang kein spezielles (oder zusätzliches) Training nötig.       * Schwimmen ist auch nochmal ein Sonderthema, was ich hier wohl ziemlich sicher nicht behandeln werde.
    • Da hast du recht, sind nur 120g Quark, schon korrigiert, danke!