Jump to content

Neu hier? Immer einlesen auf Fitness Experts.de & Fitladies.de

Empfohlene Beiträge

Am 7/25/2019 um 10:19 AM schrieb _-Martin-_:

wäre eben die frage in wie weit die neuen erkenntnisse

eReps durch nahes MV, die Bodybuilding ansätze wieder legitimieren :D

 

Ich glaube, das Fass möchte ich hier nicht aufmachen. ;)

 

Wichtig wäre mir persönlich überhaupt ersteinmal, die klare Differenzierung nach Trainingszielen hinzubekommen (auch in der Diskussion):

1. Will ich in einer Übung (oder insgesamt) stärker werden? Dann ist für die Weiterentwicklung in dem Bereich auch Muskelaufbau sehr wichtig, aber ich kann ggf. im Sinne der Spezifität im Training etwas anders darauf trainieren als wenn mein Ziel anders lautet (s. 2.)

2. Will ich Muskeln aufbauen, womöglich den ästhetischen Kriterien im Bodybuilding entsprechend? Dann ist die Kraftentwicklung zwar nicht total vernachlässigbar, aber im Sinne der Trainingsspezifität nicht an erster Stelle, sondern die Belastung bzw. das Training der Muskeln.*

3. Will ich beides mischen? Oder was anderes erreichen? ...

 

*So ähnlich ist es bei 5/3/1 (oder auch anderen Programmen), wenn man sich die Übungen dort anschaut (Main, Supplemental, Assistance) und welche Aufgabe diese jeweils im Training erfüllen sollen. Das muss man sich bewusst machen und dann auch bewusst danach trainieren, damit jede Übung so trainiert wird, dass sie ihren Zweck erfüllt.

 

Wenn ich mir als Trainierender ersteinmal klar gemacht habe, was meine konkreten Ziele sind und als nächstes, wo ich gerade stehe, ergibt sich auch eher, was man tun muss, um den Zielen näher zu kommen... daraus ergibt sich dann auch eher, was wichtig wäre, zu trainieren und ich erhoffe mir auch eine geringere Anfälligkeit in Hinblick auf die vielen, sich teils widersprechenden Informationen im Netz. "Trust the process" ist so ein geflügelter Spruch, um zu viel unsinnige Änderung im Training zu verhindern, weil jenseits des Anfängerstatus die Fortschritte (pro Zeitraum) so gering sein können.

bearbeitet von Ghost

Diesen Beitrag teilen


Link zum Beitrag
Auf anderen Seiten teilen

Neu hier? Immer einlesen auf Fitness Experts.de & Fitladies.de

Ja gerade in Bezug auf 5/3/1 finde ich hat die ganze Diskussion über Muskelaufbau etc. sehr geholfen.

mir hat immer der Bezug zur Hypertrophie in Richtung Volumen gefehlt und wie man Assistance so nutzt, dass es auch wirklich Hypertrophie erzeugt. -> Nah ans MV etc wenn höhere Repziele

 

Dadurch kann man, wie ich finde, wirklich gut auf die verschiedenen Ziele eingehen.

 

Der 5/3/1 Satz ist der Marker ob Hypertrophie in der Gesamtheit statt gefunden hat, denn ich denke wie Lyle es sagt progression over time sollte auf jeden Fall immer stattfinden, denn wenn Arme, Schultern und Brust gewachsen sind sollte man im Vergeleich zu vorher auch stärker geworden sein(Bankdrücken).

-> 1. Ziel Gesamtheitliche Hypertrophie

 

2. Ziel spezifische Hypertrophie

.. wäre dann wenn man ein gewisses Ästhetisches Bild vor Augen hat und bewusst die Stagnation in gewissen Muskelpartien und dadurch auch evtl. Mehrgelenksübungen in Kauf nimmt, um eben die Proportionen so zu verändern, dass eine gewisse Optik erreicht wird.

 

3. Ziel stärker werden in spezifischen Übungen und den Kraftübertrag optimieren, für die einzelnen Muskel die an einer Übung rekrutiert

 

 

 

 

bearbeitet von _-Martin-_

Diesen Beitrag teilen


Link zum Beitrag
Auf anderen Seiten teilen

Nochmal eine rel. aktuelle Betrachtung von Lyles GBR aus diesem Artikel von ihm selbst:

 

The Generic Bulking Routine

With the above in mind, a rough volume of perhaps 10-20 (or 8-16 depending on the analysis) sets per week as an optimal growth number, I want to look at what I have presented for years as my Generic Bulking Routine.  This was an intermediate program I drew up absolute ages ago that has proven to work for intermediates for over a decade.  I report this only anecdotally and nothing more, I’m not James Krieger who thinks anecdote counts as ‘science’.  But if we’re going to pretend to integrate science and practice, then it is always nice when practice actually matches up with the science.

It was an Upper/Lower routine done 4 times per week with each day having the general structure shown below and was meant to be done as 2 weeks of a submaximal run up and then 6 weeks of trying to make progressive weight increase (progressive tension overload being the PRIMARY driver on growth with sufficient volume within being optimal) prior to backcycling the weights and starting over with the goal of ending up stronger over time.   It was mean to be an intermediate program used from about the 1-1.5 year mark of consistent training to maybe 3 year mark before my specialization routines were implemented.

Weights didn’t HAVE to be increased every week or workout, that was simply the goal (as Dante Trudell put it in his Doggcrapp system, you should be trying to beat the log book at each workout).  In my experience, so long as folks were eating and recovering well and started submaximally, they could do so over relatively short time periods like this (over a longer training cycle, I’d do different things).  Women perhaps less so than men for unrelated reasons but no matter, Volume 2 is coming eventually…

I’m going to provide specific exercises in the template but just think of them as either compound or isolation for the muscles involved since exercise selection is highly individually dependent. RI is rest interval and note that I use fairly long ones so ensure quality of training with real weights and ideally all sets are at the same heavy weight (oh yeah, in ‘Merkun a single apostrophe is minutes and a double is seconds and I am told this is the opposite of the rest of the world).  Big compound movements get 3 minutes, smaller muscles get 2 minutes and high rep work gets 90 seconds since it’s meant to be more of a fatigue stimulus to begin with.

But for big movements, a 90 second rest interval is bullshit and means that you’re probably squatting with 95 lbs on the bar by your fifth set ‘to failure’.  Better to do less sets and give yourself long enough to do quality work.  In that vein, after the submax run up, the goal RIR was maybe 2-3 for the initial set which would likely drop to 1 or even near failure by the last set.  The goal is progressive TENSION overload over time (meaning multiple training cycles).  When your workouts don’t use stupid volumes, you’re in the gym the same amount of time but can actually do quality work than when you’re trying to fit in 45 fucking sets and get done before tomorrow.

Upper SetsXReps(RI) Lower SetsXReps(RI)
Flat Bench 3-4X6-8(3′) Squat 3-4X6-8 (3′)
Row 3-4X6-8 (3′) RDL or Leg Curl 3-4X6-8 (3′)
Incline DB Bench 2-3X10-12 (2′) Leg Press 2-3X10-12 (2′)
Pulldown 2-3X10-12 (2′) Another leg curl 2-3X10-12 (2′)
Lateral Raise 3-4X6-8 (3′) Calf Raise 3-4X6-8 (3′)
Rear delt 3-4X6-8 (3′) Seated Calf Raise 2-3X10-12 (2′)
Direct Triceps 1-2X12-15 (90″) Abs Couple of heavy sets
Direct Biceps 1-2X12-15 (90″) Low Back Couple of heavy sets

The exercises are for example only and the other two workouts per week could be a repeat of the same movement or different within that general structure (exercises can be also be changed with each succeeding training cycle).  So start with incline bench and pulldown for the sets of 6-8 and do flat bench and row for the sets of 10-12 or whatever.

Now let’s add up the set count:

Compound Chest: 5-7 sets twice/week for 10-14 sets/week (counted as 5-7 sets for tris at 0.5:1)
Compound Back: 5-7 sets twice/week for 10-14 sets/week (counted as 5-7 sets for bis at 0.5:1)
Side delts: 6-8 sets per week.
Rear delts: 6-8 sets per week (gets hit somewhat by pulling but hard to math out)

Note: Effective delt volume is likely a bit higher than this but it’s a pain in the ass to estimate how much side delts do or do not get hit by compound pushing.  Or rear delts via compound pulling.  It might math out to 8-10 sets/week or less or maybe more.  Again, hard to say but most report just fine delt growth from the above (and no shoulder problems which is why it’s an upper/lower to begin with).

Bis/Tris: 1-2 direct sets added to compound work = 2-4 sets/week + 5-7 indirect sets/week = 7-11 sets/week.  Add a third or even fourth set if you like to get 8-12 sets/week or 10-14 sets/week of combined indirect and direct arm work.  I certainly agree that if you do heavy pushing and pulling you don’t need a lot of warm work.  I simply do NOT agree that the sets count 1:1.  But my workout designs usually have proportionally less direct arm work since I partially count the compound pushing/pulling and always have and always will.

Let me comment before moving forwards that while this might seem like a low per workout volume to some (and high to others), it matches the set count data based on my analysis above.  As well, I have contended for years that if you can’t get a proper stimulus to your muscles with that number of sets, volume is not the problem.  Rather, you are.  Whether it’s due to suboptimal intensity, focus, technique sucking, etc. you are the problem with your workout.  Doing more crap sets will never top doing a moderate amounts of GOOD sets.

Regardless, looking at it now, with 15 years of experience with it and the data analysis I just did, I might bump up the side delt volume a bit.   As noted above, the contribution from chest work is tough to really establish here and the delt has three heads with differing functions.  But no matter.  Let’s focus on generalities.  Which are that my general set count for this workout is and has always been right in the range of what the analysis of the majority of the training studies found to be optimal.

This template could be adjusted in various ways.  The second chest and back movement could be isolation which would reduce the indirect set count on arms, necessitating an increase in direct work.   So if someone did 4 sets of flat bench and 3 sets of incline flye that’s still 14 sets/week for chest but reduces indirect arm work to only 4 sets/week (8 sets of compound pushing divided by 2) so you bump direct arms to 3-4 sets per workout to get to 6-8 direct sets per week and 4 indirect sets for 10-14 sets per week.  I think that makes sense.  The point being that I am looking at total set counts per week (actually I was counting reps but it all evens out) and adjusting volumes for smaller bodyparts based on exercise selection.  If you use more isolation movements for chest or back that decreases the indirect set count for bis and tris so I’d add more direct work there.

The same holds for legs where quads are worked for 5-7 sets twice weekly or 10-14 sets, same for hams and calves.  I might bump this up slightly although high volumes of truly HEAVY leg work is pretty brutal, add a third movement like leg extension and another leg curl to for a couple of higher rep (12-15 rep) sets apiece.  Now it’s 7-9 sets twice a week or 14-18 sets.  Towards the higher end of volume but until we know for sure that it’s 20+, I’m not changing much here.  And, again, a workout with 20+ heavy sets of legs (including quads, hams and calves) is gruelling.

But overall upper body comes in at somewhere between 7-14 sets for upper body muscles and 10-14 for legs.  Again, intermediate program from like 1.5-3 years or so.

Those numbers look so very familiar.

 

 

Diesen Beitrag teilen


Link zum Beitrag
Auf anderen Seiten teilen

Meine Anmerkung dazu... Ich bin nicht sicher, ob ich mit dem Wdh.-Bereich von 6-8 bei Lateral und Rear Delts einverstanden bin... da es aber so oder so immer darauf ankommt, die Gewichte so zu wählen, dass die Belastung auf den Zielmuskel kommt, dürfte es unproblematisch sein, das anzutesten... individuell nachsteuern wird man immer können/müssen, wenn man seine eigenen Erfahrungen damit gesammelt hat.

 

Edit: In einem anderen (älteren) Artikel findet man auch nochmal eine andere Variante... heißt halt nicht umsonst "Generic..." ;)

 

Upper Body Lower Body
Bench press 4X6-8/180″ Squat 4X6-8/180″
Row 4X6-8/180″ RDL 4X6-8/180″
Flye or Incline Bench 2-3X10-12/90″ Leg Ext or Split Squat 2-3X10-12/90″
Cable Pullover or Pulldown 2-3X10-12/90″ Leg Curl 2-3X10-12/90″
Lateral Raise 4X8-10/120″ Calf Raise 4X8-10/120″
Rear Delt 4X8-10/120″ Seated Calf 3X10-12/90″
Biceps 2-3X10-12/90″ Abs Whatever
Triceps 2-3X10-12/90″ Low Back Whatever
bearbeitet von Ghost
Edit

Diesen Beitrag teilen


Link zum Beitrag
Auf anderen Seiten teilen

Es ist denke ich wirklich wichtig ab einem gewissen punkt zu prüfen bzw. kritisch zu hinterfragen, wie genau man welchen Muskel mit den verschiedenen Übungen anspricht bzw. trainiert, um dann das Training spezifisch anzupassen.

 

Gerade bei kleinen Übungen mit langem Hebelarm muss man denke ich noch besser aufpassen da es einerseits sehr schwer werden kann, aber man andererseits auch viel mit Schwung schummeln kann.

 

Gerade disbalancen bei den Grundübungen können dafür eigentlich ein guter Indikator sein. Wann wo wie häufig kommen irgendwelche Sticky-Points in der Bewegung? Hängen diese an den Hebelverhältnissen ? Stagnieren evtl. einzelne Muskelpatien ? -> Damit die Grundübung an einer gewissen Stelle

 

 

 

Diesen Beitrag teilen


Link zum Beitrag
Auf anderen Seiten teilen
vor einer Stunde schrieb Ghost:

Meine Anmerkung dazu... Ich bin nicht sicher, ob ich mit dem Wdh.-Bereich von 6-8 bei Lateral und Rear Delts einverstanden bin... da es aber so oder so immer darauf ankommt, die Gewichte so zu wählen, dass die Belastung auf den Zielmuskel kommt, dürfte es unproblematisch sein, das anzutesten... individuell nachsteuern wird man immer können/müssen, wenn man seine eigenen Erfahrungen damit gesammelt hat.

Gerade mit der Prämisse durch höhere Reps immernoch Hypertrophie mit näherem MV zu erzeugen kann man denke ich ganz gut bei Seitheben und Reverse Flys arbeiten.

 

Könnte mir vorstellen Lyle hat das so programmiert, um mit einem relativ intensiven Satz zu starten, wie es in den anderen Muskelgruppen auch der Fall war/ist in seinem Plan

Diesen Beitrag teilen


Link zum Beitrag
Auf anderen Seiten teilen

Ergänzend zur GBR mal ein (minimalistisch notierter) OK/UK-Split mit einer Aufteilung in schwere und leichte Tage (in Anlehnung an Canditos LP):

 

Heavy Lower Day

Squats 3x6-8

SLDL or RDL 3x6-8

Standing Calf Raise 3-5x5

Optional Exercise 3x8-12

Optional Exercise 3x8-12

 

Heavy Upper Day

(Incline) Bench Press 3x6-8

Primary Upper Back Exercise 3x6-8 (Rows or Chins)

Shoulder Exercise 1x6-8 (OHP or (Seated) DB Press)

Upper Back Exercise #2 1x6-8 (Chins or Rows)

Optional Exercise 3x8-12

Optional Exercise 3x8-12

 

Hypertrophy Lower Day

Legpress 4x8-10

RDL 4x8-10

Hamstring Curls 3x12-15

Seated Calf Raise 3x10-12

Optional Exercise 4x8-12

Optional Exercise 4x8-12

 

Hypertrophy Upper Day

DB Chest Press (Decline) 4x8-10

DB Incline Chest Press 4x8-10

Upper Back #1 4x8-10

Upper Back #2 4x8-10

Shoulder Exercise 3x10-12

Biceps Exercise 3x10-12

Optional Exercise 4x8-12

Optional Exercise 4x8-12

 

Optional Exercises (not limited to this list):

 

Upper Body
1. Rear delt fly
2. Tricep pushdown
3. Close grip bench
4. Extremely strict dumbbell curl
5. Incline cable fly
6. Incline dumbbell press
7. Lateral raises
8. Face pulls
9. “Loose form” db bicep curls
10. Barbell bicep curls

 

Lower Body
1. Leg Press
2. Hamstring curls
3. Front squats (performed with relatively light weight)
4. Stiff Legged Deadlift
5. Singlelegged leg press
6. Overhead squats
7. Snatch Grip Deadlift

 

Wie gesagt... relativ einfach und offen notiert - ihr seht ja, welche Variation durch die optionalen Übungen möglich ist, um individuelle Schwerpunkte zu setzen.

 

(Evtl. notiere ich später im Thread nochmal einen anderen Beispielansatz mit leichten und schweren Tagen.)

bearbeitet von Ghost

Diesen Beitrag teilen


Link zum Beitrag
Auf anderen Seiten teilen

Noch ein paar Technik-Artikel von Lyle (ergänzend zu den zuvor gemachten zum Thema Bankdrücken und für die hintere Schulter):

 

Cable Row

Lat Pulldown

Back Raise

Split Squat

Training the Calves

 

Solide gemacht, mit Tipps und Hinweisen, wie man bestimmte Bereiche betont.

 

Vielleicht dazu, weil immer wieder Fragen dazu kommen: Are Upright Rows Safe Q&A

 

bearbeitet von Ghost

Diesen Beitrag teilen


Link zum Beitrag
Auf anderen Seiten teilen
vor 5 Stunden schrieb Ghost:

Evtl. notiere ich später im Thread nochmal einen anderen Beispielansatz mit leichten und schweren Tagen.

 

Hier mal ein Ansatz in Anlehnung an ein Programm von Clay Hyght:

 

Monday - Heavy Upper Body

A1 Benchpress 6x3

A2 T-Bar Row 6x3

B1 Standing Barbell Overhead Press 5x5

B2 Pull-up 5x5

C1 Skullcrusher 3x6-8

C2 Barbell Curl 3x6-8

 

Tuesday - Light Lower Body + Abs

A Unilateral Legpress 3x 25/20/15

B Dumbbell Stiff-leg Deadlift 3x12-15

C (Barbell) Walking Lunge 2x30 (total reps)

D Seated Calf Raise 3x20

E Crunch 3xAMRAP

 

Thursday - Light Upper Body

A1 Decline DB Benchpress 3x 15/12/20

A2 DB Row 3x 15/12/20

B1 DB Lateral Raise 3x15

B2 Lat-Pulldown (to the front) 3x15

C1 Preacher Curl 2x15

C2 Overhead Unilateral Triceps Extensions 2x15

 

Friday - Heavy Lower Body

A Barbell Squat 6x4

B Deadlift 4x 8/6/4/2

C Lying Leg Curl 3x6

D Standing Calf Raise 5x5

E Hanging Leg Raise 3x8

 

Diesen Beitrag teilen


Link zum Beitrag
Auf anderen Seiten teilen

Ist vermutlich eine total blöde Idee... aber ich wollte auch mal meinen Vorschlag für ein Programm vorstellen... bzw. eine Idee, die mir im Kopf herumschwebt und die u. a. meine Vorliebe für "Press like a Powerlifter, Back like a Bodybuilder" wiederspiegelt...

 

Workout 1

Deadlift 5x3-5

Legpress 4x6-8 (ss DB RDL 4x10-12)

DB Rear Lunge 4x10-12 (ss Back Raise 4x12-15)

 

Workout 2

OHP 4x6-8 (ss Lat-Pulldown 4x8-12, pronated or supinated grip)

DB Incline Benchpress 4x8-12 (ss Cable Row 4x8-12)

Cable Lateral Raise 3x10-15 (ss Rear Delt Row 3x10-15)

 

Workout 3

(Highbar) Squat 4x6-8

RDL 4x8-12 (ss Goblet Squats 4x8-12)

Crunch 3x8-12 (ss Back Raise 3x10-12)

 

Workout 4

Benchpress 4x6-8 (ss Lat-Pulldown 4x8-12, neutral grip)

Seated DB Press 4x8-12 (ss DB Row 4x8-12)

Biceps Curls 3x10-12 (ss Triceps Extension 3x10-12)

 

Angedacht für 3-4 Einheiten/Woche (einfach die Einheiten abwechseln);

Pausenzeiten: Deadlift/Squat 3-5min, Rest (bei den Supersätzen) ca. 90 Sek. d. h. bspw. Leg Press -> DB RDL -> 90sek Pause -> Leg Press usw. ...

Double-Progression (Wdh. bzw. Gewicht);

Sätze sollen "sets across" trainiert werden; zum Einstieg kann man auch die Satzzahl je Übung um 1 reduzieren

 

...ist noch etwas grob, braucht noch Finetuning, vielleicht etwas zu heftig (vielleicht muss man hier und da eine Mehrgelenksübung durch eine Iso ersetzen... Calves fehlen noch (können mit je einer Übung, wie es Lyle empfiehlt, an Workout 1 und 3 angehängt werden)...

 

Na ja... kann man ja einfach ignorieren, den Beitrag. ;)

bearbeitet von Ghost

Diesen Beitrag teilen


Link zum Beitrag
Auf anderen Seiten teilen

Du kannst deine Gedanken zu deinem Plan gerne erläutern, insb. was Satz- und Wiederholungszahlen angeht.

Wie sollte man denn jetzt z.B. an eine Übung mit 4x8-12 herangehen?

 

4x12 Wdh. Sets across mit RPE 6-7-8-9?

Oder das Gewicht so wählen, dass man nur im ersten Satz alle 12 Wdh. Schaft? Also dann z.B. 12-12-11-9 Wdh. schafft?

Oder besser das Gewicht ändern, also eine Art Dropset machen, also z.B. 4x12 mit 60-60-55-50 kg Gewicht machen?

 

Gerade mit den zuletzt häufig diskutierten eReps kommen mir 4x12 Sets across als am wenigsten Sinnvoll vor.

  • Like 1

Diesen Beitrag teilen


Link zum Beitrag
Auf anderen Seiten teilen
vor 3 Stunden schrieb Peter:

Du kannst deine Gedanken zu deinem Plan gerne erläutern, insb. was Satz- und Wiederholungszahlen angeht.

Wie sollte man denn jetzt z.B. an eine Übung mit 4x8-12 herangehen?

 

4x12 Wdh. Sets across mit RPE 6-7-8-9?

Oder das Gewicht so wählen, dass man nur im ersten Satz alle 12 Wdh. Schaft? Also dann z.B. 12-12-11-9 Wdh. schafft?

Oder besser das Gewicht ändern, also eine Art Dropset machen, also z.B. 4x12 mit 60-60-55-50 kg Gewicht machen?

 

Gerade mit den zuletzt häufig diskutierten eReps kommen mir 4x12 Sets across als am wenigsten Sinnvoll vor.

Ersteinmal vielen Dank für dein Feedback.

 

Bevor ich auf die konkreten Fragen eingehe, ein, zwei Sachen grundsätzlich vorweg...

 

Der Plan ist natürlich nicht von mir (oder sonstwem) getestet und ersteinmal rein auf dem Papier. Und natürlich kann ich nicht so tun, als hätte ich "das Rad neu erfunden", denn es gibt ja unzählige Beispiele für OK/UK-Splits... bei meinem "Glück" hat das schon irgendjemand so ähnlich ausformuliert... nein, eigentlich bin ich sicher, dass das so sein muss. ;) 

 

Ich denke, in diesem Thread sind bereits zwei Sachen klar geworden, die mir für Bodybuilding/Hypertrophietraining wichtig sind:

1. Ich will, dass die Last auf dem Ziel-Muskel ist und nicht auf den passiven Strukturen;

2. Alle Angaben, was die Trainingsparameter angeht, müssen Punkt 1 erfüllen, d. h. selbst wenn eine Übung "schwer" notiert ist, so muss doch jederzeit technisch sauber gearbeitet werden, mit Fokus auf dem Muskel.

Es darf nie so enden, dass man einen Satz beendet und das Muskelgefühl währenddessen verloren hat oder das Einen der Ehrgeiz packt, ein Gewicht zu schaffen auf Kosten des eigentlichen Trainingsziels... (das heißt nicht, dass man nicht über die Zeit auch stärker wird in den Bereichen, die man trainiert.)

 

Zu den Fragen konkret... Tatsächlich hatte ich bei den Satz-/Wdh.-Zahlen einen "sets across" Ansatz im Sinn, ähnlich wie es Lyle oben für die GBR beschreibt: In that vein, after the submax run up, the goal RIR was maybe 2-3 for the initial set which would likely drop to 1 or even near failure by the last set. 

 

Dies soll helfen, die Konzentration auf den Muskel besser zu halten, anstatt das man anfängt quasi "um sein Leben zu kämpfen", um den Satz mit dem Gewicht zu beenden. Und es soll die Last auf die passiven Strukturen mindern, weil mit zunehmender Ermüdung der Muskeln die Last oft schleichend und vom Trainierenden unbemerkt auf andere Muskelgruppen bzw. die passiven Strukturen übergeht... "better safe, than sorry" und Fokus auf ein hochqualitatives Training für den Muskel.

Zum Ausgleich dazu lieber einen qualitativ hochwertigen Satz mehr machen.

 

Das Konzept der eReps schreit IMHO geradezu nach einem HIT-ähnlichen Ansatz - vergleichsweise geringe Umfänge mit vergleichsweise hoher Intensität. Wem das liegt und wer das verträgt (aufgrund seiner körperlichen Konstitution und Proportionen), für den ist es ein guter, gangbarer Weg. Für Andere führt diese Art zu trainieren, zu Problemen und diese Personen müssen andere Wege suchen, wie z. B. mit etwas mehr RIR pro Satz zu arbeiten, aber mit zunehmenden qualitativ hochwertigen  Sätzen, als mit einem HIT-ähnlichen Ansatz. Ich vermute auch, dass eine breite Masse an Bodybuildern eher so trainiert, als mit HIT.

"Mein" Plan fällt eher in die letztgenannte Kategorie...

 

Wichtig für den Einzelnen wird aber sein, die Übungen herauszufinden, die individuell die Zielmuskeln am besten belasten und die Trainingsform zu finden, die einem am besten liegt. Letzteres hat auch und nicht zuletzt damit zu tun, was man bisher gewohnt ist/war zu trainieren. Am wichtigsten ist bei der ganzen Sache vielleicht auch die Frage: Was kann der Trainierende regenerieren (unter Einbezug aller anderen Stressoren im Leben)... und anstatt das Programm auszusuchen und alles andere nachrangig auszurichten, sollte man vielleicht umgekehrt schauen, was man individuell verkraftet und danach sein Trainingspensum gestalten.

 

Edit: Weil es auch gerade zum Thema eReps passt und ich es gerade sehe: New research on training to failure [study review]

Ist vielleicht auch so ein Ding, wo das Optimum in der Theorie in der Praxis nicht mehr so optimal ist? (Bzw. nicht alle Faktoren berücksichtigt...)

bearbeitet von Ghost
Edit

Diesen Beitrag teilen


Link zum Beitrag
Auf anderen Seiten teilen
vor 22 Stunden schrieb Ghost:

Das Konzept der eReps schreit IMHO geradezu nach einem HIT-ähnlichen Ansatz - vergleichsweise geringe Umfänge mit vergleichsweise hoher Intensität.

 

Meinst du eReps oder myo reps? Denn eWdhs beschreibt ja lediglich, wie man Volumen zählt.

 

Die Schlussfolgerungen, wie man für das gewünschte Volumen in eWdhs trainiert, werden ja durch einige Dinge beeinflusst. ZB durch deine Argumente, warum du sets across bevozugst - die ja weiterhin gelten.

 

Im Gegenteil, man kann, wie schon paar Mal erwähnt, dank eWdhs auch begründet eine sehr NIEDRIGE Intensität i.S.v. RIR/RPE trainieren - wenn die Last entsprechend hoch ist. Das ist wsl sogar eine Vergrößerung des Spielraums, der bisher so üblich war für HT.

 

Wo das Konzept der eWdh höchstens anmerken würde, dass das Training möglicherweise wenig effektiv oder effizient ist: Wenn RPE UND Lasten den Großteil der Zeit niedrig sind. Also bspw wenn man ziemlich viele Sätze hat mit mittlerer-geringer Last, sagen wir mal bei 8x10, sets across. Dabei sind die ersten Sätze zwangsläufig von so niedriger RPE, dass da fast keine eWdhs rauskommen. Und in punkto Sicherheit ist vielleicht das Gewicht niedrig - aber das hohe (junk) Volumen ist wsl per ZNS-Ermüdung nicht zuträglich für Konzentration und Koordination in den letzten Sätzen, die ja dann intensiv sein müssen. Kommt noch dazu, dass die ZNS-Ermüdung gerade bei vielen Wdh und kurzen Pausen (mit denen solche Satz-rep-Schemata oft trainiert werden, damits nicht allzu lang wird) übermäßig stark ansteigt und dadurch auch noch die Rekrutierung der hohen motor. Einheiten behindert.

 

Im Kontrast dazu kann man bei deinen sets across Ghost, auch noch ins Felde führen, dass der letzte Satz, der dann (fast) bis zum Versagen geht, gar nicht unbedingt wegen der eWdhs so intensiv gemacht wird. Sondern weil man ab und an sicher gehen möchte, dass man nicht zu stark submaximal trainiert. Denn wenn man nie ans Versagen geht und keine Erfahrung mit RPEs hat, kann man sich leicht unterschätzen und die Gewichtsprogression unnötig verzögern. Der letzte Satz ist sozusagen fast ein, sozusagen durch die Satz-rep-Kombo generierter, amrap.

 

Wenn man dagegen Erfahrung mit RPE hat, bereits eine ausgereifte Technik und noch vorsichtiger oder häufiger trainieren will, kann man, wie Peter meinte, die Vorteile von Hantelgewichts-/rep-Zahl-Änderungen über die Sätze nutzen, indem man weniger eWdhs in den ersten verschenkt. Und im letzten sogar weniger nah zum Versagen geht als bei sets across. Andy Morgan von https://rippedbody.com/ bspw ist einer von vielen coaches, die für Fortgeschrittene deshalb tatsächlich von sets across abgekommen sind. Dabei ists dann auch ne Aufwandsfrage: Wenn man umständlich Gewichte abbauen muss, kann das nerven. Wenn ich bei ner Kabelübung nur kurz mal den Stecker um eins leichter nach oben verschiebe, um die gleiche RPE und eWdh bei gleicher Wdhzahl zu haben oder einfach eine Wdh weniger mache, dann ist das schnell getan.

 

 

Diesen Beitrag teilen


Link zum Beitrag
Auf anderen Seiten teilen

Einen weiteren Ansatz, diesmal angelehnt an einen Plan von Ben Bruno, wollte ich auch noch vorstellen...

 

Diesmal ein GK-Ansatz für 3 Einheiten pro Woche. Einschränkend muss ich vorweg sagen, dass die Anzahl der "hard sets" nahe am Minimum angesetzt wird und ein GK-Ansatz immer Probleme bereiten kann, wenn man explizit auf viele Muskelgruppen (isoliert) eingehen will, aber gleichzeitig die Trainingszeit je Einheit auch nicht zu lang werden soll (Reg Parks Program anyone?). ... Insofern ein Vorschlag als Startpunkt, den man mal antesten kann, wenn man mag und wo man dann nach individuellem Bedarf etwas gezielt hinzufügen kann, wenn es von der Regeneration her passt und für die Ästhetik nötig ist (etwas für die Waden bzw. den Rectus Abdominis ist sicher kein Problem, genauswenig eine leichte Iso für die hintere Schulter, Bizeps/Trizeps o. ä.).

 

Das Prinzip des Aufbaus einer Einheit ist wie folgt:

Training 1: Heavy Lower Body, Medium Pull, Light Push

Training 2: Heavy Push, Medium Lower Body, Light Pull

Training 3: Heavy Pull, Medium Push, Light Lower Body

 

Heavy = 6-8 Reps; Medium = 8-12 Reps; Light = 10-15 Reps; "Effort" sollte immer hoch sein, d. h. 1-2 RIR

 

Zur Übungsauswahl:

- Push/Pull bezieht sich auf den OK und es sollte jeweils einmal horizontal und einmal vertikal gearbeitet werden (Bspw. Rows and Chins).

- Beim Lower Body sollte einmal eine Kniebeugebewegung und eine Kreuzhebebewegung dabei sein, aber zu Letzterem würden auch "Hip-Thrusts" zählen, wenn gewünscht; ebenso kann/sollte man eine einbeinige Übung einbauen (Bsp. Bulgarian Split Squats).

- Im "Light"-Slot kann auch eine Iso platziert werden.

- Übungen können natürlich nach einem Trainingsblock (bspw. 6-12 Wochen) variiert werden

 

Ein Beispiel:

 

Training 1:

Legpress 4x6-8

Cable Row 4x8-12

Pec-Dec Flies 4x10-15 (alt. Seated DB Press)

 

Training 2:

Incline Bench Press 4x6-8

RDL 4x8-12

Lateral Raise 4x10-15 (alt. Rear Delt Rows)

 

Training 3:

Chins/Lat-Pulldown 4x6-8

(Assisted) Chest Dips 4x8-12

Bulgarian Split Squats 4x10-15/Leg (alt. Leg Extensions or Leg Curls)

 

Wenn man die obige Aufzählung (Waden (schwer und leicht), Abs, Bizeps, Trizeps, hintere bzw. seitl. Schulter) nimmt, dann kämen je 2 Übungen je Trainingstag dazu, was verkraftbar sein sollte.

Oben beim 3. Slot habe ich mal jeweils eine Alternative dazu geschrieben, die auch gehen würde und anhand derer man sehen kann, wie man die Satzanzahl zugunsten gewisser Muskelgruppen verschieben könnte, wenn man Schwerpunkte setzen möchte.

Diesen Beitrag teilen


Link zum Beitrag
Auf anderen Seiten teilen

Eine andere Alternative, einen GK-Ansatz aufzuziehen, wäre, wenn man jeden Trainingstag einem bestimmten Wdh.-Bereich zuordnet (bspw. 6-8, 8-12, 10-15) und dann dazu passende Übungen für die jeweiligen Muskelgruppen zuordnet. Bspw. ...

 

Training 1 (4x6-8 Reps)

Legpress

Incline Benchpress

RDL

T-Bar Row (or Chins)

 

Training 2 (3-4x8-12)

Goblet Squats

Decline Chest Press

Back Raise

(Assisted) Pull-ups (or Cable Rows)

 

Training 3 (2-3x10-15)

Hack Squats

(Weighted) Push-ups (or (Assissted) Dips)

Hip Thrust

Neutral Grip Lat Pull-downs (or Close Neutral Grip Rows)

 

Beide Ansätze haben den Vorteil der eingebauten Variation in den Übungen bei trotzdem hoher Frequenz der trainierten Muskeln. Nachteilig auch hier, dass Details und Isos wohl nur in begrenztem Maße hinzugefügt werden können, wenn die Einheiten nicht zu lang dauern sollen.

 

Zusammengefasst kann man vielleicht sagen, dass man mit einem OK/UK-Split schon eine gute Mischung, ein gutes Gesamtpaket für die meisten "Normaltrainierenden" schnüren kann, während bei einem GK-Ansatz der Vorteil der hohen Frequenz u. U. mit dem Nachteil erkauft wird, nicht mehr so gut auf die Details eingehen zu können.

Noch nicht darauf eingegangen bin ich, wie man einen 3er-Split gemäß der Vorgaben sinnvoll trainieren kann, wenn man tatsächlich eher 4-6 Tage Krafttraining machen will (um alle Muskelgruppen wieder 2x/Woche bis spätestens alle 5 Tage zu trainieren). Vielleicht später... Ist ja keine Überraschung für die Leser hier, dass es vermutlich auf Push/Pull/Legs oder Brust/Rücken, Beine, Schultern/Arme hinauslaufen würde...

Diesen Beitrag teilen


Link zum Beitrag
Auf anderen Seiten teilen
Am 8/1/2019 um 1:32 PM schrieb Ghost:

Noch nicht darauf eingegangen bin ich, wie man einen 3er-Split gemäß der Vorgaben sinnvoll trainieren kann, wenn man tatsächlich eher 4-6 Tage Krafttraining machen will (um alle Muskelgruppen wieder 2x/Woche bis spätestens alle 5 Tage zu trainieren). Vielleicht später... Ist ja keine Überraschung für die Leser hier, dass es vermutlich auf Push/Pull/Legs oder Brust/Rücken, Beine, Schultern/Arme hinauslaufen würde...

Vor dem Hintergrund, dass letztendlich alle von mir aufgeführten Pläne letztendlich im passenden Rahmen anpassbar sind und sein sollten - ich sehe diese Pläne nicht als geeignet für blutige Anfänger - werde ich kurze Beispiele für die genannten 3er-Splits aufführen.

 

Bei einem 3er-Split sollte man streng genommen bereits 5-6x/Woche (bzw. rotierend 3on, 1off) trainieren, um jede Muskelgruppe spätestens alle 5 Tage zu trainieren. Wer so eine Aufteilung gegenüber einem 2er-Split vorzieht, kann danach auch 3-4x/Woche trainieren, aber das wäre nach den aktuellen Erkenntnissen theoretisch weniger optimal.

 

Die zwei Hauptmöglichkeiten der Einteilung der Trainingstage ist oben aufgeführt, also ohne weitere Vorrede...

 

Push/Pull/Legs

 

Push

Incline Bench Press  4x6-8

Chest Flies 3x8-12

Decline Chest Press 3x10-15

Triceps Extensions 2x10-15

 

Pull

Lat-Pulldown 4x6-8

Cable Row 4x8-12

Cable Lateral Raise 3x10-15

DB Rear Delt Row (or PecDec Reverse Flies) 3x10-15

Biceps or Hammer Curls 2x10-15

 

Legs

Legpress 4x6-8

RDL 4x8-12

Leg Extensions 2-3x10-15

Leg Curls 2-3x10-15

Standing Calf Raise 5x5

Seated Calf Raise 3x8-12

Abs

 

Chest/Back, Legs, Shoulder/Arms

 

Chest/Back

Bench Press 4x6-8

Lat-Pulldown 4x6-8

Cable Incline Chest Flies 3x8-12

T-Bar Row 4x8-12

DB Rear Delt Row (or PecDec Reverse Flies) 3x10-15

 

Legs (s. o.)

 

Shoulder/Arms

Seated DB Press 3x6-8

DB Lateral Raise 3x8-12

Bent-over DB Lateral Raise 3x8-12

Biceps Curl 2x10-15

Triceps Extension 3x10-15

Hammer Curls 2x10-15

 

Wenn man will, kann man auch Chest/Shoulder und Back/Arms kombinieren, um die Schwerpunkte anders zu setzen.

 

Wie geschrieben... alle Ansätze sind nur Beispiele, die innerhalb des Rahmens individuell anpassbar sind und so nur als ein möglicher Startpunkt dienen.

bearbeitet von Ghost
Typos

Diesen Beitrag teilen


Link zum Beitrag
Auf anderen Seiten teilen

Zum Thema "6 Trainingseinheiten pro Woche"... Man kann natürlich auch in dem Fall bei einem OK/UK-Split bleiben, was Vorteile für die Entlastung des Schultergürtels hat, im Gegensatz zu einigen anderen Aufteilungen und einfach Lyles GBR als Basis nutzen, jedoch die Umfänge je Einheit reduzieren.

 

Bsp.:

 

Upper Body Lower Body
Barbell Flat Bench: 2X6-8 Back Squat: 2X6-8
Overhand Cable Row: 2X6-8 RDL: 2X6-8
DB Incline Bench: 1-2X10-12 Leg Press: 1-2X10-12
Pulldown or Chin: 1-2X10-12 Leg Curl: 1-2X10-12
Lateral Raise: 2-3X10-12 Calf Raise: 2X6-8
Rear Delt: 2-3X10-12 Seated Calf: 1-2X10-12
A Biceps exercise: 1-2X10-12 Abs: 2-3X6-8
A Triceps exercise: 1-2X10-12 Low Back: 2-3X6-8

 

(Da ist man dann alternativ auch wieder im Prinzip dicht beim HST.)

bearbeitet von Ghost
Typos

Diesen Beitrag teilen


Link zum Beitrag
Auf anderen Seiten teilen

Zu alternierenden Plänen:

Es wird häufig empfohlen, dass man den Muskel 2x die Woche belasten soll um einen Wachstumsreiz zu setzen. Lassen wir Volumen und Co erstmal ausen vor und konzentrieren uns darauf einen Muskel 2x die Woche zu belasten.

 

Dazu eine Frage: Alternierende Pläne verwenden oft die Grundübungen. Treffen Kreuzheben und Kniebeugen in etwa die selben Muskelgruppen? 

Diesen Beitrag teilen


Link zum Beitrag
Auf anderen Seiten teilen
vor 14 Stunden schrieb Simon Martins:

Treffen Kreuzheben und Kniebeugen in etwa die selben Muskelgruppen?

Ja... nur mit unterschiedlichen Schwerpunkten (je nach Variante). Für die Zwecke des Bodybuilding interessieren hier hauptsächlich nur die Beinmuskeln (vordere und hintere Oberschenkel und Waden) und solange man bei den Übungen keine Extremvarianten wählen würde, erfüllt man das Kriterium 2x/Woche. (Allerdings kommen bei diesen beiden Übungen auch immer schnell andere Aspekte dazu, so dass man die Übungen in Hinblick auf Bodybuilding anders bewerten kann... bspw. die systemische Gesamtbelastung etc.)

 

Deadlift

Squat

 

Und es gilt grundsätzlich, dass du den Agonisten eigentlich nie ohne Aktivierung des Antagonisten trainieren kannst, weil der sehr oft eine Stabilisierungsfunktion (der beteiligten Gelenke) übernimmt. (Hier kam/kommt es öfter mal zu Diskussionen, ob ein Muskeln zwingend als Zielmuskel 2x/Woche trainiert werden muss, oder ob die "mitaktivierung" bei Übungen als "Synergist" oder "Antagonist Stabilizer" bereits ausreicht. Aktuell meint man aber bei den Frequenzangaben in dem Bereich eher "2x/Woche als Zielmuskel", wobei "Überlappungen" bei der Belastung durch Übungen u. U. schon eine wichtige Rolle bei der Trainingsgestaltung spielen, weswegen der OK/UK-Split von Lyle auch deswegen bevorzugt wird, weil er die klarste, strikteste Trennung der trainierten Muskelgruppen erlaubt, wobei er auch hier die Frage betont, ob man bei 2 aufeinanderfolgenden Trainingstagen bei OK vor UK den Schultergürtel und oberen Rücken noch nicht voll erholt hat, wenn man dann Kniebeugen/Kreuzheben macht.)

bearbeitet von Ghost
  • Like 1

Diesen Beitrag teilen


Link zum Beitrag
Auf anderen Seiten teilen

Vielleicht noch ein kurzer Gedanke, der zwar den Meisten hier offensichtlich sein dürfte, aber vielleicht trotzdem sinnvoll ist...

 

Jeder hat ja so seine Vorbilder, Leute denen er nacheifert etc. ... Häufig holt man sich ja auch von diesen Leuten und dem was sie schreiben seine Anregungen für das Training usw. ... Ein Problem was dabei grundsätzlich auftreten kann ist, ob diese Infos immer so gut auf den eigenen Trainingsstand und die eigene Situation (oder individuelle Voraussetzungen) treffen oder nicht.

Plakativ formuliert... Ich erwähne hier ja oft Stu Yellin (andere Leute haben andere Vorbilder, wie Helms o. a.) und zitiere hier mal so dann und wann Aussagen von ihm. Man muss dabei nur immer im Kopf behalten, dass das, was ein (Ex-) Profi aktuell macht, nicht auf meine aktuelle Trainingssituation passt. Ich bin halt kein (Ex-) Profi mit ähnlicher Trainingshistorie, ich habe nicht dieselbe Entwicklung durchlaufen und auch (hoffentlich) nicht mit denselben alten Verletzungen zu kämpfen.

O. k. ... einfach... schau ich halt, wie mein Vorbild vorher trainiert hat, um dahin zu kommen, wo er jetzt ist... "Problem" gelöst... Oder auch nicht, denn evtl. hat mein Vorbild auch seine Phasen gehabt, wo er (aus heutiger Sicht) unsinnig trainiert hat und auch er/sie wird in seiner Trainingskarriere bereits einiges an unterschiedlichen Programmen durchlaufen haben, um Erfahrungen zu sammeln... und es wäre sicher nicht schlau, dieselben Fehler wie mein Vorbild zu machen, oder?

 

Und nun? ... Am sinnvollsten wird es vermutlich sein, einerseits auf die bewährten Trainingsprinzipien und aktuellen wissenschaftlichen Erkenntnisse zu schauen und danach sein Training, seinem Stand angemessen auszurichten. Dazu dann beim Training eigene Erfahrungen zu sammeln, um analysieren zu können, was jeweils gut oder nicht so gut funktioniert und sein Training anhand dieser Erkenntnisse in Hinblick auf seine Trainingsziele weiterzuentwickeln. Trainingsprinzipien werden sich aktuell nicht so schnell ändern und man kann auch darauf vertrauen, dass sie funktionieren werden, wenn man mal "Durststrecken" durchläuft ("Trust the process!"). Und man kann trotzdem immer aktuell, wie individuell nötig, innerhalb des Rahmens oder der Zwänge von außerhalb (Arbeit bspw.) seine Anpassungen vornehmen und seine Trainingsziele weiter verfolgen. Man muss bei allem, was man liest, im Prinzip schauen, ob es eine allgemein gültige Info für jedermann ist, oder ob die Info für eine spezielle Situation oder einen speziellen Trainingsstand gedacht und wichtig ist und daher für mich aktuell keine Relevanz hat. Zu lernen, diese Sachen zu unterscheiden und vernünftig zu bewerten, erscheint mir Angesicht der Fülle an verfügbaren Informationen immer wichtiger zu werden.

bearbeitet von Ghost
  • Like 1

Diesen Beitrag teilen


Link zum Beitrag
Auf anderen Seiten teilen
vor 4 Stunden schrieb Ghost:

Ja... nur mit unterschiedlichen Schwerpunkten (je nach Variante). Für die Zwecke des Bodybuilding interessieren hier hauptsächlich nur die Beinmuskeln (vordere und hintere Oberschenkel und Waden) und solange man bei den Übungen keine Extremvarianten wählen würde, erfüllt man das Kriterium 2x/Woche. (Allerdings kommen bei diesen beiden Übungen auch immer schnell andere Aspekte dazu, so dass man die Übungen in Hinblick auf Bodybuilding anders bewerten kann... bspw. die systemische Gesamtbelastung etc.)

 

Deadlift

Squat

 

Und es gilt grundsätzlich, dass du den Agonisten eigentlich nie ohne Aktivierung des Antagonisten trainieren kannst, weil der sehr oft eine Stabilisierungsfunktion (der beteiligten Gelenke) übernimmt. (Hier kam/kommt es öfter mal zu Diskussionen, ob ein Muskeln zwingend als Zielmuskel 2x/Woche trainiert werden muss, oder ob die "mitaktivierung" bei Übungen als "Synergist" oder "Antagonist Stabilizer" bereits ausreicht. Aktuell meint man aber bei den Frequenzangaben in dem Bereich eher "2x/Woche als Zielmuskel", wobei "Überlappungen" bei der Belastung durch Übungen u. U. schon eine wichtige Rolle bei der Trainingsgestaltung spielen, weswegen der OK/UK-Split von Lyle auch deswegen bevorzugt wird, weil er die klarste, strikteste Trennung der trainierten Muskelgruppen erlaubt, wobei er auch hier die Frage betont, ob man bei 2 aufeinanderfolgenden Trainingstagen bei OK vor UK den Schultergürtel und oberen Rücken noch nicht voll erholt hat, wenn man dann Kniebeugen/Kreuzheben macht.)

Vll magst du das nochmal spezifizieren, da ich jetzt keinen kenne, der für hypertrophy (/oder auch Kraft) DL und Squats gleich Programmen würde.

 

die Empfehlungen mit 2x/Woche+ beziehen sich soweit ich weiß auch eher auf die primäre MG und nicht alles was vll iwie auch getroffen wird.

 

Das sollte man denke ich nochmal hervorheben und wenn man dann sowas wie 2x/Woche mit 10 Sets/Woche erreichen möchte, und DL und Squats gleich zählt wird man in der Praxis denke ich verschiedene Probleme kriegen.

 

in anfängerplänen werden die beiden Übungen denke ich häufig alternierend und „gleich“ behandelt, weil die skill Entwicklung viel weiter im folus steht und die niedrigen relativen trainingslastend deutlich geringer sind.

Diesen Beitrag teilen


Link zum Beitrag
Auf anderen Seiten teilen
vor 58 Minuten schrieb Fabber:

Vll magst du das nochmal spezifizieren, da ich jetzt keinen kenne, der für hypertrophy (/oder auch Kraft) DL und Squats gleich Programmen würde.

Ich kenne auch niemanden... hauptsächlich war das auf die Frage von Simon in Bezug auf "alternierende Pläne" bezogen, was ich als "alternierende GK-Pläne" wie z. B. den FEM interpretiert habe. Und da sind wir eher noch im Bereich der "Anfängerpläne", wo noch keine zu große Spezialisierung auf Bodybuilding stattfindet. Bei vielen spezialisierten Bodybuildingplänen rücken beide Übungen oft in den Hintergrund und dann stellt sich die Frage zumeist auch gar nicht.

 

vor 58 Minuten schrieb Fabber:

die Empfehlungen mit 2x/Woche+ beziehen sich soweit ich weiß auch eher auf die primäre MG und nicht alles was vll iwie auch getroffen wird.

Ja, genau... wobei die "primäre Muskelgruppe" ja auch schonmal Gegenstand von Diskussionen werden könnte und die Zählung von Umfängen in Hinblick auch Belastung einzelner Muskelgruppen dementsprechend auch problematisch werden kann und nicht zuletzt auch sowohl von der jeweiligen Übungsvariante abhängt und den individuellen Proportionen.

 

vor 58 Minuten schrieb Fabber:

Das sollte man denke ich nochmal hervorheben und wenn man dann sowas wie 2x/Woche mit 10 Sets/Woche erreichen möchte, und DL und Squats gleich zählt wird man in der Praxis denke ich verschiedene Probleme kriegen.

 

Korrekt, s. o.

 

vor 58 Minuten schrieb Fabber:

in anfängerplänen werden die beiden Übungen denke ich häufig alternierend und „gleich“ behandelt, weil die skill Entwicklung viel weiter im folus steht und die niedrigen relativen trainingslastend deutlich geringer sind

 

Korrekt, s. o., und der Sinn eines Zweck eines Anfängerplans ist eben auch ein gutes Stück weit ein anderer als ein Bodybuildingplan für fortgeschrittene Anfänger bzw. Fortgeschrittene.

 

(Falls ich deine Einwürfe falsch interpretiert habe oder nicht so beantwortet, wie du es präzisiert haben wolltest, schreib bitte nochmal konkreter, worauf du hinaus wolltest.

bearbeitet von Ghost

Diesen Beitrag teilen


Link zum Beitrag
Auf anderen Seiten teilen
vor 19 Stunden schrieb Fabber:

die Empfehlungen mit 2x/Woche+ beziehen sich soweit ich weiß auch eher auf die primäre MG und nicht alles was vll iwie auch getroffen wird

BTW... du kennst dich doch etwas besser mit Helms Büchern aus... Magst du vielleicht hier vorstellen, wie Helms die Umfänge je Muskelgruppe zählt? (Oder mag jemand anders?) (Von Lyle hat man es ja verkürzt hier.)

 

Unabhängig davon, dass die Methode so oder so, wie oben erwähnt, im Einzelfall ungenau bzw. problematisch sein kann, stellt sie doch immerhin einen Startpunkt dar, wonach man sich ersteinmal richten kann, wenn man einen gewissen Überblick über die "hard sets" gewinnen will... die ergebnis-abhängige Anpassung muss dann ggf. ja sowieso erfolgen.

Diesen Beitrag teilen


Link zum Beitrag
Auf anderen Seiten teilen

Ein weiteres Beispiel für einen Push/Pull/Legs-Split (nach Shelby Starnes) ausgelegt für 4 Trainingstage pro Woche (nicht mehr als 2 Tage hintereinander trainieren) und definitiv nicht für totale Anfänger.

 

Push:

Incline DB Benchpress 4x8

Decline Smith Machine Benchpress 3x10, Dropset 8, 8

Wide Grip Benchpress 2x12, touch and go, no lockout

 

Seated DB Laterals 4x8

Rear Laterals Reverse Flies (Pec Dec) 1 Dropset 30, 25, 20, 15, 2min rest 1x8 (heavy)

Smith Machine Front Press 4x8 (1sec. Contraction at the top)

 

Bar Pushdowns 4x 15, 12, 10, 8 (pyramid up in weight), lean forward 45°, bring bar to forehead, flex hard every rep)

Incline Skull Crushers 3x10 (good stretch)

Close-grip (CG) Pushups (bodyweight) 2x to failure

 

Pull:

CG Seated Rows 4x8 (good stretch at the bottom, strong contraction for 1sec. at the top)

Chest-Supported Rows 3x12 (elbows out)

DB Pull-overs 3x15

BB Shrugs 2x20 (strong contraction at the top for 2sec.)

Good Mornings 3x 20, 15, 12 (pyramid up in weight; strict form, slow and controlled reps)

Stretch (Hang from Pull-up bar, as long as you can)

 

DB Curls 4x8 (palms up, 3-sec. negative) superset with

Machine Curls 8 Reps (squeeze hard on every contraction)

EZ-Bar Reverse Curls 2x20 (first 15 up to the chin)

 

Legs:

Squats 3x 12, 10, 8 (pyramid up in weight; 3-sec. descent)

Hack Squats 2x12, (feet high and wide; go down and up only 3/4th) Dropset 12, 8, 8

Seated Leg Curls 3x 12, 10, 8, Dropset (12rep weight) 8, 6, 2, 25 partials out of the bottom)

Standing Calf Raise (Smith Machine) 3x20 (rest between sets 60sec.)

 

Edit: Auch von Starnes eine andere Variante von PPL:

 

Day 1

Chest

Pec-dec (to pre-exhaust): 3 sets of 12 reps 

Arch your sternum high, and on every rep, hold the contraction for 1 second.

Incline Dumbbell Press: 4 sets; 15 reps, 12 reps, 10 reps, 8 reps (all to failure – pyramid up in weight)

Use whatever grip is most comfortable and that you feel most in the chest. I personally prefer my elbows pointing down at about a 45-degree angle from my body, and I hold the dumbbells about midway between a pronated (palms down) and a neutral (hammer) grip.

Dips: 2 sets to failure (add weight if you can)

Lean in on these and get a good stretch in your chest on all reps

 

Shoulders

Seated Dumbbell Laterals -   3 sets of 12 reps

Go up to shoulder level and return under control. I personally like using wrist straps for these. Relax your traps (think of “sinking” them) to minimize their recruitment during the movement.

Bent-over Dumbbell Lateral - 3 sets of 25 reps

Keep reps under control. Use wrist straps if you like. Rest 30 seconds between sets. High reps are great on rear delts.

Barbell Overhead Press – 3 sets of 8 reps

Use controlled form and flex hard at the top for 1 second on all reps.

 

Triceps

Rope Pushdowns: 3 sets: 15, 12, 10 reps (pyramid up in weight)

Flex hard on every rep. Rest about 45 seconds between sets.

Upright Dips (or dip machine) – 3 sets of 8 to 10 reps (add weight if needed to get target rep range)

Use a shoulder width grip and go down until your upper arms are parallel with the ground.

Ez-Bar Skullcrushers: 3 sets of 15 reps 

Extend bar up and back away from your head (not directly above your head) and at the bottom, let the weight really stretch you out, every rep.

 

Day 2

Back

Wide Grip Pulldown: 4 sets of 15 reps

Use a wide, overhand grip. Squeeze at contraction for 1 second on every rep.

Dumbbell Row Deadstops: 4 sets of 10 reps

Regular db rows, but rest the db on the floor for a second on every rep. Work hard on these! Crank some weight.

Dumbbell Shrugs: 3 sets of 12 reps.

Squeeze every rep at the top for 3 seconds.

Floor Deadlifts: 3 sets: 1 x 5, 1 x 4, 1 x 3

Work up to a heavy set of 5, then add a little weight and do 4 reps, then a little more weight for a final set of 3 reps.

 

Biceps

EZ-Bar Curls: 4 sets: 15 reps, 12 reps, 10 reps, 8 reps (all to failure – pyramid up in weight

Use a fairly close grip and don’t swing the weight. Bring it up to your chin and squeeze for a second on every rep. Rest 60 seconds between sets.

DB Curls with 3-second Negatives: 3 sets of 8 reps

Keep palms up the entire time. Rest 60 seconds between sets.

Machine Curl: 1 set of 20 reps

Use a machine preacher curl if you have one that you like, or if not, then use standing cable curls.

 

Day 3

Legs

Lying Leg Curls:  4 sets: 15 reps, 12 rep, 10 reps, 8 reps.

Keep your feet close together, with your toes pointed (like a ballerina on tippy-toes). Get a good 1 second contraction at the top of all reps. On the last set, after the 8 reps, drop the weight in half and knock out 20 reps (this is a dropset, do the 20 right after the 8).

Leg Press: 3 sets: 1 x 20, 1 x failure, 1 x failure

First set is a HARD 20 reps, then keep same weight and do 2 more sets to failure (you’ll probably get 15 reps on the second set, and 10 on the third). Use a shoulder width stance. Each rep should be fluid, don’t stop at the top. Go deep, but not so far that your butt and lower back lifts off the pad.

Squats: 1 set of 20 reps

Use a shoulder-width stance. Always squat BELOW parallel. This is when the crease of your hips breaks parallel with the top of your knees. Basically, ass to grass. This set should be a ball-breaker. Use a weight you could normally do maybe 12 or 13 reps with, but get to 20.. no matter how many breaks you need to take at the top. Go balls out… train like a champion.

Smith Machine Lunges: 4 sets of 10 on each leg

Do all reps on one leg, then immediately do the other leg, then rest 45 seconds, then repeat 2 more times for 3 x 10 total.

Stiff Leg Dumbbell Deadlifts: 4 sets of 10 reps

Get a good stretch on all reps.

Standing Calf Raises (or Calves on Leg Press) – 4 sets of 12 reps

Don’t bounce reps – hold stretched position for a count of one before starting next rep. Take 1 minute rest between sets.

Seated Calf Raises – 4 sets of 15 to 20 reps

Hold stretched position for a count of one before starting next rep. 1 minute rest between sets.

 

Notes

  • DO NOT move up in weight if you’re training sloppy – that will only result in injury. I cannot stress enough how important it is that you train safely and remain injury-free.
  • With all the exercises, go to complete positive failure (assuming proper form). This means you cannot complete another full rep with good form. Training past this point (by doing incomplete reps, forced reps, etc.) will only over-stress your central nervous system, which is not a good thing.
  • For every movement on every exercise, always EXPLODE on the concentric, and control/resist on the eccentric.
  • It is imperative that you keep a logbook and always try to beat your previous weights or reps, while remembering to always use impeccable form. On smaller bodyparts like biceps it will be hard to add weight all the time, so try to add reps there first. When you can get the upper rep range with a certain weight, then try adding a small amount of weight (if you can get magnetic “Plate-mates” that come in 1.25-pound or smaller increments, those would be best).

 

Auch nicht exakt für Anfänger... im Vergleich zur anderen Variante (diese ist auch für 4 Einheiten/Woche) etwas andere Übungen, weniger Intensitätstechniken (Dropsets), eher in etwas höherem Wdh.-Bereich pro Satz, hier und da mal eine Übung als "Pre-Exhaust"... Zeigt halt mögliche Variationsmöglichkeiten für individuelle Bedürfnisse...

bearbeitet von Ghost
Typos

Diesen Beitrag teilen


Link zum Beitrag
Auf anderen Seiten teilen

Erstelle ein Benutzerkonto oder melde dich an, um zu kommentieren

Du musst ein Benutzerkonto haben, um einen Kommentar verfassen zu können

Benutzerkonto erstellen

Neues Benutzerkonto für unsere Community erstellen. Es ist einfach!

Neues Benutzerkonto erstellen

Anmelden

Du hast bereits ein Benutzerkonto? Melde dich hier an.

Jetzt anmelden